JLS (jlsjlsjls) wrote,
JLS
jlsjlsjls

Fun out in the sun ...

Yesterday afternoon's out-and-aboutness included an all-important stop at the comics shop, where some very good reading was sitting on the shelves and calling my name:

Jack of Fables, vol. 3 : the bad prince, by Bill Willingham and Matthew Sturges. The further adventures of Jack o' the Tales, exile from the main "Fables" comic book series. In this issue, Jack discovers the downside of having made himself the central component of most folklore when he becomes Excalibur's new home, along with the relevation that he's not the man he thought he was (somebody else is that man instead). Good good stuff and some interesting set-ups for the next instalment ... can't wait!

Y: the last man, vol. 10 : whys and wherefores, by Brian K. Vaughan. Final volume and wrap-up of this series. The comic shop manager told me a while back that the ending made her cry (she was reading the comics books, while I was waiting for the collected trade edition) ... and I admit that I shed a few tears myself. The ending of the main story ... well, that was pretty much as predicted. But the fates of the individual characters! What can I say, except happy endings are like pretty roses ... they have a multitude of thorns. Now I want to spend a day re-reading the whole thing from start-to-end in one go ...

Zero girl : full circle, by Sam Kieth. Fifteen years after the ending of the original Zero girl, the principal characters meet again ... this time the problem is the next generation. But some things never change ... squares are still scary, while circles are friendly.

Four women, by Sam Kieth. A woman describes a night that changed the lives of herself and her three friends to a therapist. But something in the story just doesn't add up. I'd seen good reviews and must-read comments about this title for a while, and so was happy to finally get my hands on a copy. WOW! An up-close and claustrophobic look at what people claim they will do in a life-or-death situation compared to their reactions faced with the real thing. Writer/artist Sam Kieth says in his foreword that he was inspired by a real life situation that happened to a female friend of his ... he also says that he thinks the story rings false because he isn't a woman nor has he ever been through what the characters suffer. My opinion is that he did a damn fine job in this telling ... terror is terror and trauma is trauma and, when you get right down to the core of them, neither has a gender. HIGHLY recommended.
Tags: reading
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